NMESIS – Marines New Ship-Killing Missile System

NMESIS

NMESIS is still under testing, and was recently tested by the US Marine Corps during the Large Scale Exercise 21 at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. NMESIS is short for Navy Marine Expeditionary Ship Interdiction System, and is a combination of the NSM (Naval Ship Missile), and the ROGUE firing platform. On August 15, Marines and other branches practiced their ship-sinking capability off the coast of Kauai – the target was the decommissioned USS Ingraham (FFG 61).

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SINKEX, the exercise scenario involving NMESIS, provided a testing environment for new and developing technologies to connect, locate, identify, target and destroy adversary threats in all domains, culminating in the live-fire demonstration of the naval strike missile against a sea-based target. During the exercise, forward-deployed forces on expeditionary advanced bases detected and, after joint command and control collaboration with other U.S. forces, responded to a ship-based adversary. Simultaneous impacts from multiple, dispersed weapons systems and platforms across different U.S. services—including NMESIS—engaged the threat.

DVIDSHUB
NMESIS photo by Maj. Nicholas Mannweiler/U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific

The system was created by Raytheon in response to General David Berger’s request for a Marine Corps anti-ship missile. It has been under development for about two years and has a range of about 100 nautical miles The USMC is due to receive the system in October.

McPherson and Lt. Col. Ryan Collins, rockets and artillery capabilities integration officer Combat Development and Integration, spoke with media by phone about the weekend launch from Hawaii on Tuesday.

Marines did the first-ever load/offload of the system onto a Marine-flown C-130 out of VMGR-352 and landing craft air cushion, or LCAC. They also passed data for the successful firing. But since the system was still under testing, Systems Command staff did the actual shoot.

Marines did the first-ever load/offload of the system onto a Marine-flown C-130 out of VMGR-352 and landing craft air cushion, or LCAC. They also passed data for the successful firing. But since the system was still under testing, Systems Command staff did the actual shoot.

Marine Corps Times

The NMESIS system has the capability for “waypoint programming.” In other words, it doesn’t have to travel in a straight line. It carries a 500 pound warhead, according to the Marine Corps Times. Other details about the system were unavailable.

According to the MCT, other venues practiced their targeting on the USS Ingraham: “U.S. Third Fleet’s Carrier Strike Group One launched F/A-18E/F Super Hornets to test the Joint Standoff Weapon; F-35C Joint Strike Fighters employed laser-guided weapons; P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft tested the Harpoon weapon system; The fast-attack submarine USS Chicago (SSN 721) fired an UGM-84 anti-ship Harpoon missile and a Mark 48 Advanced Capability torpedo; A division of F/A-18Cs from the VMFA-323 Death Rattlers took part in SINKEX, delivering precision lethal fires with AGM-84 Harpoons; U.S. joint forces conducted coordinated multi-domain, multi-axis, long-range maritime strikes in the Hawaiian Islands Operating Area during the sinking of the decommissioned guided-missile frigate ex-USS Ingraham.”

The United States is practicing playing war with formidable technology. We sincerely hope the US can actually win a war when necessary, since that’s been in doubt lately. Many of our military (actual warfighters) are ready and willing. The leadership maybe not so much.

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Featured photo: U.S. joint forces conduct a coordinated multi-domain, multi-axis, long-range maritime strikes in the Hawaiian Islands Operating Area during a sinking exercise on the decommissioned guided-missile frigate ex-USS Ingraham (FFG 61), Aug. 15, 2021. (MC1 David Mora Jr./U.S. Navy)

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